Hacking and Security

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If you own a D-Link router, stomp it, burn it, and never buy D-Link again

Maybe other router manufacturers are as magnificently dumb as D-Link but regardless, get rid of all D-Link routers and vow to never buy another D-Link product for a long as your lungs suck in air. The security vulnerabilities present in their devices, especially the DWR-932B router, are so far beyond stupid, well, you’d swear the Chinese company purposely allowed them as a joke on Americans…
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Akamai’s decision to drop Krebs’ DDoS protection wasn’t an infrastructure thing – yeah, right

I wasn’t too happy to hear that Akamai dropped security researcher/writer Brian Krebs last week after Kreb’s website sustained the largest-ever DDoS attack. In short, they basically offered Krebs protection from DDoS attacks until, well, they said they couldn’t. Then they dropped him leaving Krebs to fend for himself.
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How to tell if you’re on a government watchlist (and how to get on and off the wild ride)

People often wonder if their names have somehow made it to the “the list”, that watchlist of US citizens whom the government suspects may be up to something. I would venture to say, the best way to know if you’re on the watchlist would be to recognize how often you find yourself forced into unique situations that fall far beyond the norm.
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Who’s really behind the DNC/NSA hacks? Russia, Snowden, independent hacker, or hybrid of all three?

Regardless of whether you consider Edward Snowden’s leaks of classified information to be self-sacrificial acts of patriotism or the deeds of a traitor, the recent DNC data dump and NSA cyber weapons malware (milware?) code drops have all the markings of a Snowden escapade. If you disagree, consider the timing of the code drop and who has the most to gain.
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The United States is outsourcing its Cyberspace (Cyber Command) Operations – really?

It’s a draft title Task Order Request for Cyberspace Operations Support Services in support of United States Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM). Oh, brother. That means the U.S. has bungled their cybersecurity so badly they’re now willing to outsource, and trust, this critical national security task to an outside contractor. Even a partner outside of the U.S. if they’re trusted status.
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Interesting geographic attack vector from a Russian launched cyber counter-attack

I love the Russians. I know, strange to hear that from an American in modern day with a new “cold war” (seemingly) beginning to gain steam. Let’s say, I respect them. Their hackers in particular. Their response to a cyberattack is to launch a full-on offensive attack against the attacker, quite a different response from the Chinese who tend to just block attackers, or the Americans, who never even notice an attack is taking place.
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Are Wild Neutron’s latest attacks related to the zero-day exploit(s) in Hacking Team’s drop?

Both Kaspersky and Symantec released reports this week pointing out the increase in attacks by Wild Neutron (aka Jripbot, Morpho, or Butterfly). WN had gone mostly dormant (or undetected?) since 2013 after hitting Apple, Facebook, Twitter, and Microsoft using zero-day Java exploits (seeded in the hacked forums of various websites) and the OSX/Pintsized Mac OS X or Windows Jiripbot backdoor.
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14 days running a secret Dark Web pedophile honeypot (and why I now think Tor is the devil)

Before discoursing the lengthy analysis of the Dark Web honeypot (the pedophile honeypot in particular), let’s answer the question that is surely on everyone’s mind – did the honeypot allow me to reveal the true identity of the person visiting the site?

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