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Total Solar Eclipse 2024 – A complete guide to watching one of nature’s grandest, most spectacular events on April 8, 2024.

Total Solar eclipse 1999 in France

Total solar eclipse 2024 – why this spectacular event is a must-see show

The total solar eclipse 2024 will be visible in North America and other parts of the world on April 8, 2024. This upcoming event is generating a lot of excitement among astronomers, skywatchers, and eclipse chasers. The eclipse is predicted to last up to 4 minutes and 27 seconds, which is almost twice as long as The Great American Eclipse that occurred on August 21, 2017. That eclipse was witnessed by around 20 million people from Oregon to South Carolina. The extended duration of the 2024 Great American Eclipse and the density of the population it will pass over, is sure to provide ample opportunity for millions of skygazers to observe and record this rare natural phenomenon.

April 8, 2024 Solar Eclipse -total solar eclipse 2024

Aside from its extended duration, solar eclipse 2024 is also noteworthy for a number of other reasons. For one, it will be the first total solar eclipse visible in Canada since February 26, 1979, and the first in Mexico since July 11, 1991. Those living in parts of Canada, the United States, and Mexico will be able to witness the cosmic event in all its glory. The fact that it is the only total solar eclipse in the 21st century where totality will be visible in all three countries has added to the buzz and excitement surrounding the event.

Even more important, Solar Eclipse 2024 will be the final total solar eclipse visible in the Continental US until August 12, 2045. That’s over two decades away! So, if you want to witness this incredible phenomenon, the time to prepare is now. Don’t miss out on this rare opportunity to see the Sun’s corona while standing in the shadow of the moon. It truly is a breathtaking sight that you won’t soon forget. Mark your calendars and start planning your trip to see the 2024 Great American Eclipse. Geek Slop is here to help you get started.

What is a solar eclipse – what causes the Sun to disappear?

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, blocking the Sun from the viewer on Earth. Totality (when the Moon completely blocks the face of the Sun) occurs only in a narrow path across Earth’s surface, with the partial solar eclipse visible over a surrounding region thousands of miles wide.

The Moon’s apparent diameter will be 5.5% larger than average, occurring only one day after perigee (perigee on Sunday, April 7, 2024). With a magnitude of 1.0566, its longest duration of totality will be of four minutes and 28.13 seconds near the town of Nazas, Durango, Mexico (~6 km north), and the nearby city of Torreón, Coahuila.

Solar eclipse series members between 1801 and 2100

Solar Eclipse 2024 is part of a Tritos cycle that repeats every 135 synodic months (approximately 3986.63 days or 11 years minus 1 month). Here are all the solar eclipses that will occur in the 22nd and 23rd centuries. Note the 11-year gap between each occurrence.

In the 22nd century:

  • Solar saros 147: annular solar eclipse of August 4, 2111
  • Solar saros 148: total solar eclipse of July 4, 2122
  • Solar saros 149: total solar eclipse of June 3, 2133
  • Solar saros 150: annular solar eclipse of May 3, 2144
  • Solar saros 151: annular solar eclipse of April 2, 2155
  • Solar saros 152: total solar eclipse of March 2, 2166
  • Solar saros 153: annular solar eclipse of January 29, 2177
  • Solar saros 154: annular solar eclipse of December 29, 2187
  • Solar saros 155: total solar eclipse of November 28, 2198

In the 23rd century:

  • Solar saros 156: annular solar eclipse of October 29, 2209
  • Solar saros 157: annular solar eclipse of September 27, 2220
  • Solar saros 158: total solar eclipse of August 28, 2231
  • Solar saros 159: partial solar eclipse of July 28, 2242
  • Solar saros 160: partial solar eclipse of June 26, 2253
  • Solar saros 161: partial solar eclipse of May 26, 2264
  • Solar saros 162: partial solar eclipse of April 26, 2275
  • Solar saros 163: partial solar eclipse of March 25, 2286
  • Solar saros 164: partial solar eclipse of February 22, 2297

How to view a solar eclipse safely

ISO-certified solar eclipse glasses

Solar eclipses can be safely viewed by following some simple rules. Use only ISO-certified-safe solar eclipse glasses and viewers, and keep them on while the Sun is not yet fully eclipsed. Once the sky suddenly turns dark, and the solar corona appears, you may take off your eclipse glasses or viewers to look at the Sun’s amazing corona.

Sun eclipse glasses

A total solar eclipse is the only type of solar eclipse where viewers can momentarily remove their eclipse glasses. It is only safe to remove your eclipse glasses during what is known as totality, the brief period when the Moon is completely blocking the Sun.

It is important to note that eclipse glasses are NOT regular sunglasses. Regular sunglasses, no matter how dark, are not safe for viewing the Sun. Safe solar viewers are thousands of times darker and must comply with the ISO 12312-2 international standard.

Before using your eclipse glasses or handheld viewer, inspect them for any tears, scratches, or other damage. If you find any damage, discard the device. Always supervise children when they are using solar viewers.

Do NOT use a camera lens, telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device to look at the Sun while wearing eclipse glasses or using a handheld solar viewer. The concentrated solar rays will burn through the filter and cause serious eye injury.

Alternatives to solar eclipse glasses

To view Solar Eclipse 2024 safely, you can also use an indirect viewing method if you don’t have eclipse glasses or a handheld solar viewer. One way to do this is by using a pinhole projector, which projects an image of the Sun onto a nearby surface through a small opening (such as a hole punched in an index card). Make sure the Sun is behind you when using this method. Do NOT look at the Sun through the pinhole.

A special note about solar filters and viewing an eclipse through a camera, binoculars, or telescope

If you’re using cameras, binoculars, or telescopes to view the partial phases of the eclipse, do NOT use solar eclipse glasses or handheld viewers. These require different solar filters. However, if you equip cameras, binoculars, or telescopes with proper solar filters, you don’t need to wear eclipse glasses. The solar filters will protect your eyes just like the eclipse glasses do.

What are the stages of a solar eclipse?

During a total solar eclipse, there are different stages to observe. It is important to keep your eclipse glasses on until the Moon has fully covered the Sun, which is called “totality”, at which point it is briefly safe to remove them.

First Contact

The eclipse begins when the Moon first touches the Sun. It is only initially visible through a telescope, then through binoculars, and finally with the unaided eye.

As the Sun begins to vanish, daylight fades. The process is very slow. The color and quality of the sky, clouds, and landscape will change.

Partial Eclipse

Total Solar Eclipse Before Totality
The last glimmer of the sun is seen as the Moon makes its final move over the sun during the total solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon.

During a solar eclipse, the Moon moves between the Sun and Earth, causing the Sun to appear as a crescent shape. The partial eclipse phase typically lasts between 70 and 80 minutes for most locations. To safely view the Sun during this phase, it’s important to wear eclipse glasses.

Shadow Bands

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During an eclipse, shadow bands can sometimes be seen moving rapidly across the ground or the sides of buildings. They are characterized by long, dark bands separated by white spaces, although they can be faint and difficult to photograph. These bands are caused by the distortion of sharp-edged light from the solar surface as it passes through the Earth’s upper atmosphere, which contains turbulent cells of air. This distortion is similar to the way starlight is distorted, causing stars to twinkle.

Baily’s Beads

Total solar eclipse Baily's Beads
The Baily’s Beads effect is seen as the Moon makes its final move over the Sun during the total solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon.

Although the stages up to this point may seem agonizingly slow, things really pick up at this point. It’s important to have everything ready and in place. Your camera should be set and ready to fire but remember not to lose yourself in the camera lens. You’ll want to get the full impact by watching the event unfold.

During a total solar eclipse, points of light can be seen around the edges of the Moon as it moves across the Sun. These are called Baily’s Beads and are rays of sun that shine through the valleys along the Moon’s horizon. Although Baily’s Beads are short-lived, they may not be visible to all observers of the total solar eclipse.

Diamond Ring

Total solar eclipse diamond-ring effect
The diamond-ring effect occurred at the beginning and end of totality during a total solar eclipse. As the last bits of sunlight pass through the valleys on the moon’s limb, and the faint corona around the Sun is just becoming visible, it looks like a ring with glittering diamonds on it.

As the Moon’s shadow crosses, Baily’s Beads will gradually vanish until only a single bright spot remains. This spot looks like a diamond in a giant diamond ring created by the rest of the Sun’s atmosphere. Totality is approaching.

Totality

Total Solar Eclipse

Once the diamond ring disappears and it is no longer directly in the path of the sun, you may safely remove your eclipse glasses and view the total eclipse with the naked eye. This moment is also known as “second contact”. During totality, you may be able to see the chromosphere (a region of the solar atmosphere, appearing as a thin circle of pink around the Moon) and the corona (the outer solar atmosphere, appearing as streams of white light). However, be sure to remain vigilant in protecting your eyes and put your solar eclipse glasses back on before totality ends. Totality may only last a minute or two in some locations.

During totality, shoot your pictures, then take a moment to observe your surroundings. You might see a 360-degree sunset and some bright stars or planets in the darkened sky. The air temperature will drop, and an eerie silence may settle around you. It’s also worth taking a quick look at the people around you – many people have a strong emotional response when the Sun goes into totality.

Brightening Reappears

As the Moon moves across the face of the Sun, you will see brightening on the opposite side from where the diamond ring shone at the beginning. This is the lower atmosphere of the Sun, peeking out from behind the Moon. It is a signal to stop looking directly at the eclipse. Put your eclipse glasses back on or watch the eclipse through a safe, indirect method before the first flash of sunlight appears around the edges of the Moon. If you are looking through optics, now is the time to replace your solar filters. This moment is also called third contact.

Diamond Ring, Baily’s Beads, and Shadow Bands – Again

After ensuring that your eyes are protected once again, you may proceed to watch the final stages of the eclipse. The end process is similar to the beginning, with the reappearance of the diamond ring, Baily’s Beads, and shadow bands before the entire Sun becomes visible.

Fourth contact is when the eclipse is entirely over, and none of the Sun is covered by the Moon’s shadow. At this point, it is likely that you have already packed up your belongings and started planning your next eclipse adventure.

April 8, 2024 solar eclipse 2024 viewing guide

The major cities inside the path of Solar Eclipse 2024 are Mazatlan, Torreon, San Antonio, Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth, Indianapolis, Cleveland, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and Montreal. Here is a quick rundown of the areas the eclipse will cross over.

Landfall at Mexico

The Moon’s shadow will first touch down on land at Isla Socorro, which is 600 km away from the Mexican mainland. The total solar eclipse will first be visible on the mainland near Mazatlan, Mexico. The duration of totality will be up to 4 minutes and 20 seconds along the center line. During its path through Mexico, totality will pass through the states of Sinaloa (including Mazatlán), Durango (including Durango and Gómez Palacio), and Coahuila (including Torreón, Matamoros, Monclova, Sabinas, Ciudad Acuña, and Piedras Negras).

United States overview

Solar Elipse 2024 is the second total solar eclipse visible from the central United States in just 7 years, after the eclipse of August 21, 2017. Solar eclipse 2024 will be visible in several states of the United States, including Texas (which covers parts of San Antonio, Austin, and Fort Worth and all of Arlington, Dallas, Killeen, Temple, Texarkana, Tyler, and Waco), Oklahoma, Arkansas (including Morrilton/Petit Jean, Hot Springs, Searcy, Jonesboro, and Little Rock), Missouri, Illinois (including Carbondale, where it intersects the path of the 2017 eclipse), Kentucky, Indiana (including Bloomington, Evansville, Indianapolis, Anderson, Muncie, Terre Haute, and Vincennes), and Ohio (including Akron, Dayton, Lima, Roundhead, Toledo, Oak Harbor, Cleveland, Warren, Newton Falls, and Austintown)

It will be visible in Michigan (the extreme southeastern corner of Monroe County), Pennsylvania (including Erie), Upstate New York (including Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Rochester, Syracuse, the Adirondacks, Potsdam, and Plattsburgh), and northern Vermont (including Burlington), New Hampshire, and Maine. The total solar eclipse will pass almost directly over Mount Katahdin, which is the highest point in the state of Maine. Dallas, Texas will be the largest city that lies entirely on the path of the eclipse.

Lastly, totality will pass through the town of Wapakoneta, Ohio, which is the hometown of Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot upon the Moon. This will be the last total solar eclipse visible in the contiguous United States until August 23, 2044.

Texas

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in Texas

Fortunately, Solar Elipse 2024 will be visible in the major cities of San Antonio, Austin, Dallas, and Fort Worth in Texas. This makes Texas a popular destination for eclipse chasers due to its high probability of good weather, numerous hotel rooms, and extensive highway system that can be useful for last-minute relocation to clearer skies.

A remarkable fact is that the entire metropolitan area of Dallas and Fort Worth, a megalopolis of 7 million people, is entirely inside the path of totality! In fact, 12 million people in Texas reside within the path of totality, by far the largest of any state in the US.

In April, Texas has the best weather forecast along the path and a great highway system. Dallas, Ft Worth, Austin, and San Antonio have plenty of places to stay. Some cities with long periods of totality include Eagle Pass, Uvalde, Kerrville, Fredericksburg, Llano, Lampasas, Killeen, Waco, Sulphur Springs, Burleson (where Geek Slop is located!), and the southeastern suburbs of Dallas.

Moving around Texas to view the eclipse

To view the eclipse, it’s important to be able to move around, especially in case of bad weather. Within Texas, Interstate 10 from Junction to San Antonio is within the path and is a good option for quick relocation if clouds threaten. The long stretch of Interstate 35 from Austin to Waco to Fort Worth and Dallas will be a key route for many eclipse chasers, an ideal traffic corridor if relocation is needed.

Notable Total Solar Eclipse 2024 Viewing events in Texas

A major eclipse viewing event will be held in Waco, Texas on eclipse day that is hosted by the Lowell Observatory, Discovery Network, Baylor University, and the city of Waco.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in Texas

Solar eclipse 2024 enters Texas at the international border at 1:27 pm CDT and leaves Texas at the Oklahoma and Arkansas borders at 1:49 pm CDT. Through Texas, the speed of the Moon’s shadow will increase from about 1580 miles per hour to about 1850 miles per hour.

Oklahoma

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in Oklahoma

The Choctaw Nation, the 2nd largest Native American reservation in the United States, covers the entire path of the total solar eclipse in Oklahoma. Visitors coming to view Solar Eclipse 2024 may find Idabel and Broken Bow to be good places to stay, with scenic locations like Beavers Bend State Park and Broken Bow Lake providing camping options.

Moving around Oklahoma to view the eclipse

Mobility is essential for eclipse viewing, particularly in case of inclement weather. US route 259 provides north-south mobility in the area and to northern Texas, while US route 70 provides east-west mobility.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in Oklahoma

The total solar eclipse will visit Oklahoma on April 8, 2024, beginning at 1:44 pm CDT. The Moon’s shadow will exit the state for the final time at 1:51 pm CDT. As the shadow moves through Oklahoma, its speed will increase from about 1680 miles per hour to about 1745 miles per hour.

South central states overview

The Moon’s shadow will cross Hot Springs and Little Rock, Arkansas after Texas. The path will also come close to St. Louis, which will result in a significant amount of traffic south to the path. Additionally, Carbondale, Illinois will experience its second total solar eclipse just seven years after the August 21, 2017 eclipse.

Arkansas

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in Arkansas

Arkansas has good weather and many scenic state parks that provide camping opportunities. Cities such as Texarkana, Hot Springs, Little Rock, Jonesboro, and Paragould offer ample accommodations.

Moving around Arkansas to view the eclipse

For viewing the eclipse, it’s important to be mobile, especially in case of bad weather. In Arkansas, you can view the total solar eclipse from the entirety of Interstate 30 from Texarkana to Little Rock and also along Interstate 40 from Atkins to nearly Lonoke. Hot Springs National Park, one of only two national parks visited by the path of totality, is a key attraction.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in Arkansas

Solar eclipse 2024 will be visible in Arkansas on April 8, 2024, starting at 1:45 pm CDT, with the final exit of the Moon’s shadow from the state at 2:00 pm CDT. The speed of the Moon’s shadow through Arkansas will increase from about 1700 miles per hour to about 1850 miles per hour.

Missouri

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in Missouri

Southeast Missouri will be a popular destination for Solar Eclipse 2024 viewers. The cities of Doniphon, Poplar Bluff, Cape Girardeau, and Perryville are attractive destinations with a long duration of totality and good highway access. Many citizens of St. Louis are expected to make the short drive south along the Mississippi River on eclipse day.

Moving around Missouri to view the eclipse

Mobility is essential for eclipse viewing, especially in case of bad weather. Interstate 55 south from St. Louis through Perryville and Cape Girardeau to New Madrid provides many options for mobility if dodging clouds is necessary. US Route 60 from Poplar Bluff to the Mississippi River offers good east-west access.

Notable Total Solar Eclipse 2024 Viewing events in Missouri

There will be a special eclipse conference in Cape Girardeau on July 21-22, 2023. The Missouri Solar Eclipse Expo is free to register and you can register at moeclipse.org.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in Missouri

Missouri will experience a total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024, beginning at 1:53 pm CDT. The final exit of the Moon’s shadow from the state will be at 2:02 pm CDT. The speed of the Moon’s shadow through Missouri will accelerate from about 1775 miles per hour to about 1900 miles per hour.

Kentucky

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in Kentucky

Paducah, located on the Ohio River, is the main city in the path of totality. The Ohio River meanders in and out of the path of totality multiple times.

Moving around Kentucky to view the eclipse

When it comes to viewing the eclipse, flexibility is crucial, especially in the event of bad weather. If clouds are present and you need to relocate, Interstate 24 provides easy access to southern Illinois from Paducah.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in Kentucky

On April 8, 2024, Solar Eclipse 2024 will arrive in Kentucky at 1:58 pm CDT and leave the state at 2:01 pm CDT. As the shadow of the Moon moves across Kentucky, its speed will increase from about 1830 miles per hour to about 1960 miles per hour.

Illinois

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in Illinois

Carbondale is a popular choice for many people in Illinois due to its proximity to the eclipse centerline and prior experience with the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse. Southern Illinois University is hosting a major eclipse viewing event.

Moving around Illinois to view the eclipse

Mobility is key for eclipse viewing, especially in case of bad weather. Southern Illinois is easily accessible from St. Louis and is expecting a surge of eclipse visitors. A long stretch of Interstate 64 from St. Louis to Louisville is within the path of totality, and Interstate 57 and 24 provide north-south access from Chicago and Kentucky.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in Illinois

Solar eclipse 2024 will make its way through Illinois, starting at 1:58 pm CDT and ending at 2:06 pm CDT. As it passes through the state, the speed of the Moon’s shadow will increase from approximately 1830 miles per hour to about 1975 miles per hour.

The Midwest overview

The following cities are in the path of the total eclipse: Indianapolis, Dayton, Toledo, Cleveland, and Akron. The metropolitan areas close to the path include St. Louis, Cincinnati, Detroit, and Pittsburgh. On the early morning of April 8, 2024, there will be extremely heavy traffic into the path.

Indiana

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in Indiana

The metropolitan area of Indianapolis will experience a total solar eclipse, lasting from 3 and a half minutes to 3 minutes and 50 seconds, depending on the suburb or town. Bloomington will have over 4 minutes of totality, while Terre Haute and Evansville will get around 3 minutes.

Moving around Indiana to view the eclipse

For optimal eclipse viewing, mobility is essential, especially in case of inclement weather. Indianapolis is the nexus of several interstate highways: 65 to the northwest, 70 to the east and west, 74 to the southeast, and 69 to the southwest, making it easy to get around.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in Indiana

Solar Eclipse 2024 will cross Illinois on April 8, 2024, starting at 3:01 pm EDT. The Moon’s shadow will leave the state for the final time at 3:12 pm EDT. As it passes through Indiana, the speed of the Moon’s shadow will increase from about 1700 miles per hour to about 1850 miles per hour.

Unfortunately, the weather in Indiana during April can be challenging, with only a one in three chance of clear skies during the eclipse.

Ohio

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in Ohio

Cleveland is a big city in the path of totality. Other cities like Dayton, Toledo, Bowling Green, Akron, and more will also see totality. Cincinnati, Columbus, Canton, and Youngstown are close to the path, and we expect many people in these cities to drive north on eclipse day. Wapakoneta, the birthplace of Neil Armstrong, will also experience totality and is notable for the Armstrong Air & Space Museum.

Moving around Ohio to view the eclipse

To see the eclipse, it’s important to be able to move around, especially in case of bad weather. In Ohio, Interstate 75 goes north-south from Dayton to Toledo. Interstate 90 runs parallel to Lake Erie from Toledo to Cleveland and Ashtabula. Interstate 71 from Cleveland to Columbus will be another important route. Ohio has many good highways and infrastructure for Solar Eclipse 2024 visitors.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in Ohio

The total solar eclipse will come to Ohio on April 8, 2024 starting at 3:08 pm EDT. The Moon’s shadow will leave Ohio at 3:19 pm EDT. As it passes through Ohio, the speed of the Moon’s shadow will increase from about 1995 miles per hour to about 2290 miles per hour.

Pennsylvania

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in Pennsylvania

For optimal viewing of Solar Eclipse 2024, it’s recommended to be in the city of Erie, which is situated near the beautiful Presque Isle State Park. This park has a sandy peninsula that’s perfect for maximizing the duration of totality, which can last up to a generous 3 minutes and 45 seconds. Another location to consider is Erie Bluffs State Park, which offers viewpoints that are 90 feet above Lake Erie. From here, you can enjoy a panoramic view of the Moon’s shadow crossing the lake.

Moving around Pennsylvania to view the eclipse

It’s important to be mobile during the eclipse, especially in case of inclement weather. In northwest Pennsylvania, Interstate 90 runs parallel to the Lake Erie coastline, providing options for relocation. Another option is Interstate 79, which is south of Erie and offers access to this region.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in Pennsylvania

Solar eclipse 2024 will begin at the Ohio border at 3:15 pm EDT and will leave Pennsylvania at the New York border at 3:20 pm EDT. During its journey through Pennsylvania, the Moon’s shadow will accelerate from about 2175 miles per hour to about 2340 miles per hour.

Northeastern United States overview

Niagara Falls is a popular destination and a picturesque location for eclipse photographers. Other cities along the path of totality include Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Burlington, and Presque Island. Major cities like New York City, Boston, Washington DC, and Philadelphia are located within 200 miles of the path. Depending on the weather, there may be a significant number of people traveling from the Eastern Seaboard to the path of totality on the day before and day of the eclipse.

New York

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in New York

The major cities of New York that will experience the total solar eclipse are Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse. Niagara Falls is also expected to be a popular spot for Solar Eclipse 2024 viewers looking for a scenic viewpoint.

Moving around New York to view the eclipse

To get the best view of the eclipse and to prepare for inclement weather, mobility is key. Visitors can take advantage of the long stretch of Interstate 90 that runs from the Pennsylvania border through Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse for easy travel. Interstate 81 also runs north from Syracuse to Watertown and the Canadian border. Those visiting upstate New York to view the eclipse will find many accommodations in the major cities of the region.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in New York

Solar Eclipse 2024 will occur in New York on April 8, 2024, starting at 3:16 pm EDT and ending with the final exit of the Moon’s shadow from the state at 3:29 pm EDT. As it passes through New York, the speed of the Moon’s shadow will increase from around 2210 miles per hour to about 2735 miles per hour.

Vermont

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in Vermont

Burlington on Lake Champlain is the largest city in Vermont and will experience approximately 3 minutes and 15 seconds of totality during the total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024. Other cities within the path include Montpelier, St Albans City, Williston, Newport, and St Johnsbury. If the weather is clear on eclipse day, you may want to consider taking a chairlift ride at Stowe Mountain Resort, Smugglers’ Notch Resort, Mad River Glen Cooperative, Sugarbush Resort, Jay Peak Resort, or Burke Mountain to witness the spectacular views of the Moon’s shadow moving across the landscape.

Moving around Vermont to view the eclipse

Mobility is essential for eclipse viewing, especially in the event of inclement weather. Consider using Interstate 89 along the western side of the state or Interstate 91 along the eastern side to relocate if necessary due to cloud cover.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in Vermont

Solar Eclipse 2024 will begin in Vermont on April 8, 2024 at 3:25 pm EDT, with the Moon’s shadow finally exiting the state at 3:31 pm EDT. The speed of the Moon’s shadow will increase from 2550 miles per hour to 2860 miles per hour as it passes through Vermont.

New Hampshire

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in New Hampshire

The area in New Hampshire where the total solar eclipse will be visible has a low population, with the town of Colebrook being the largest settlement. The longest duration of the eclipse will be at the northernmost tip of the state, near the Canadian border.

Moving around New Hampshire to view the eclipse

To view the eclipse, it is important to be mobile, especially in case of bad weather. The major north-south highway in this area of New Hampshire is US Route 3.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in New Hampshire

Solar eclipse 2024 will occur in New Hampshire on April 8, 2024, starting at 3:28 pm CDT and ending at 3:31 pm CDT when the Moon’s shadow exits the state. As it passes through New Hampshire, the speed of the Moon’s shadow will increase from about 2,666 miles per hour to about 2,906 miles per hour.

Maine

Optimal Viewing of Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in Maine

The path of Solar Eclipse 2024 totality in Maine has a low population density and is characterized by forests and state parks. The eastern border, near Canada, has the highest population density within the path of totality. Houlton is a recommended destination in Maine because it is close to the centerline of the eclipse.

Mt. Katahdin is a prominent peak that presents an interesting opportunity for eclipse viewing. If you are in Baxter State Park or another location with a view, take a video or timelapse capture to see the dramatic sight of the Moon’s shadow suddenly darkening the peak.

Moving around Maine to view the eclipse

Mobility is essential for eclipse viewing, especially in case of inclement weather. Interstate 95 from Howland to Houlton provides access to the area and options for relocation. US Route 1 goes north from Houlton to Presque Isle and Caribou.

Solar Eclipse 2024 Timing in Maine

Solar eclipse 2024 visits Maine on April 8, 2024, beginning at 3:28 pm EDT, with the final exit of the Moon’s shadow from the state at 3:35 pm EDT. Through Maine, the speed of the Moon’s shadow will accelerate from about 2690 miles per hour to about 3175 miles per hour.

Montreal and Canada

Montreal is located within the path of Solar Eclipse 2024, and the major Canadian cities of Toronto, Ottawa, and Quebec are just a short drive away from it. The eclipse will pass through parts of the provinces of Ontario and Quebec before continuing on to the Maritime Provinces of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

In Canada, the path of totality will pass over parts of Southern Ontario (including Leamington, Hamilton, Niagara Falls, Kingston, Prince Edward County, and Cornwall), parts of southern Quebec (including Montreal, Sherbrooke, Saint-Georges, and Lac-Mégantic), central New Brunswick (including Fredericton and Miramichi), western Prince Edward Island (including Tignish and Summerside), the northern tip of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, and central Newfoundland (including Gander and Grand Falls-Windsor). Eventually, the path will end on the eastern Atlantic coast of Newfoundland.

Some Canadian cities, such as Hamilton and Montreal, are situated on the edge of the path of totality. Windsor, London, Toronto, and Ottawa lie just north of the path of totality, while Moncton lies just south of it.

Europe

The eclipse will be visible partially in the following locations:

  • Svalbard, Norway
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • West parts of Great Britain
  • Northwest parts of Spain and Portugal
  • The Azores and Canary Islands of Spain.

Americas

The eclipse will be partially visible in all Central American countries, from Belize to Panama, and in all Greater Antilles (Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica).

What if the weather impacts the solar eclipse 2024 viewing? What if it is cloudy on the day of the eclipse?

Undoubtedly, the most striking feature of a solar eclipse is the gossamer corona, which can only be seen if the sky is clear and transparent. However, several other phenomena can still be observed even if the Sun is covered by clouds. The surroundings will darken, the temperature will drop, and wildlife and domesticated animals in the vicinity will behave differently.

Typically, April brings changeable weather along the eclipse path. In Mexico and the southern states, afternoon convective buildups are common. Meanwhile, the northern states and Canadian provinces still experience late winter and early spring weather, with passing low-pressure disturbances that can bring a mix of rain and snow.

Out of all the factors that affect eclipse viewing, the amount of clouds on the day of the eclipse is likely the most important, unless severe storms are present in the south or spring storms with blizzard-like conditions are passing through the north. In general, cloud patterns are fairly simple: the lowest average cloud amounts are found in the south, especially in Mexico, while the greatest amounts are found in the Northeastern States and Canada.

Satellite measurements indicate that cloud cover varies along the path of Solar Eclipse 2024 from Mazatlan to Torreón, Mexico, with an average of 25-35%. Gradually increasing to over 50% along the Texas-Mexico border. In Carbondale, IL, where the 2024 track intersects with that of the 2017 eclipse, the average cloud coverage reaches 60%, peaking at 75% in western Ohio. Due to the influence of lakes Erie and Ontario, cloud cover along the central eclipse line drops to 60-65% through Cleveland, OH, Buffalo, NY, and Rochester, NY.

In Vermont, Quebec, Maine, and New Brunswick, April sees a maximum average cloudiness of 80% or more before decreasing by about 15% along the shores of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The town of Tignish, Prince Edward Island, has the best cloud-cover prospects in the northeast due to its exposure to the Gulf, with average monthly amounts falling back to 65%. In Newfoundland, the path of April storms leads to a peak average monthly cloud cover of 80-85%.

Maps show that some locations off the central axis of the eclipse have more favorable cloud coverage for eclipse viewing. The western side of the track through Texas experiences sunnier skies than the eastern side, and the same is true in Arkansas and Missouri, where average April cloud cover can be up to 20% lower than on the east side, around Jonesboro. Through New York, Vermont, and Maine, heavier cloud cover tends to favor higher terrain, though the differences across the shadow path are not large, as these states already have a high average cloud cover in springtime.

Check the weather in the days preceding the event and plan accordingly. You can create a driving route that will quickly take you to better viewing locations. Still, if you experience the 2024 solar eclipse in cloudy conditions, all is not lost. Remind yourself that even in ideal conditions, you end up seeing some things that others miss, and missing some things that others see. That’s why people travel around the world seeking opportunities to view eclipses!

Solar Eclipse 2024 Additional Information

Which states in the path of Solar Eclipse 2024 were also in the path of the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse?

The path of Solar Eclipse 2024 will cross the path of the prior total solar eclipse of August 21, 2017. The intersection of the two paths will be in southern Illinois, specifically in Makanda, just south of Carbondale. The cities of Benton, Carbondale, Chester, Harrisburg, Marion, and Metropolis in Illinois; Cape Girardeau, Farmington, and Perryville in Missouri; and Paducah, Kentucky, will be within a roughly 9,000-square-mile (23,000 km2) intersection of the paths of totality of both the 2017 and 2024 eclipses. As a result, these cities will have the distinction of witnessing two total solar eclipses within a span of seven years.

Solar Eclipse 2024 viewing events

StateCityEventDate
TexasHarper, TexasUBarU Camp and Retreat CenterApril 6–9, 2024
Waco, TexasEvents are still being plannedApril 8–9, 2024
Mineola, TexasEclipse, Texas FestivalApril 6–8
Del Valle, TexasLive Oak Brewing Company will host an event from 1 PM EDT on April 8, 2024 to 4 AM EDT on April 9, 2024
ArkansasDanville, ArkansasBeing planned
De Queen, ArkansasDates still being planned
Mena, ArkansasBlue Zip Line & FarmApril 6–8
Hot Springs, ArkansasMid-America Science MuseumApril 8
Clinton, ArkansasEvents and dates are still being planned
Marshall, ArkansasEvents and dates are still being planned
Eureka Springs, ArkansasEvents and dates are still being planned
Russellville, ArkansasPlanning in progress
IllinoisChester, IllinoisEvents and dates are still being planned
Carbondale, IllinoisEvents and dates are still being planned
Benton, IllinoisEvents and dates are still being planned
KentuckyHenderson, KentuckyEvents and dates are still being planned
IndianaVincennes, IndianaScheduled for April 7
French Lick and West BadenScheduled for April 8
Bloomington, IndianaFestivities, including live performances, art, poetry, special guests, and trivia competitions are plannedApril 8
Speedway, IndianaThe Indianapolis Motor Speedway will host a NASA broadcast. Further programming is to be announced.
New Castle, IndianaNew Castle Motorsports Park is planning an event on April 8, 2024
OhioDayton, OhioEvents are planned
Forest, OhioScheduled for April 8, 2024
Cleveland, OhioThe Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is planning the 2024 Total Eclipse of the HeartLAND event from 12:00 EDT to 3:55 pm EDT on April 8, 2024
Wapakoneta, OhioThe city and Armstrong Air & Space Museum are planning activities, events, and watch parties
New YorkBuffalo, New YorkEvents and dates are still being planned
Rochester, New YorkEvents and dates are still being planned with the Rochester Museum & Science Center, the Strasenburgh Planentarium, and the Cumming Nature Center
Sackets Harbor, New YorkEvents are being planned with updates to be found on the Chamber of Commerce website
MaineMillinocket, MaineMillinockeclipse is a footrace where runners will start when the eclipse begins and stops when the eclipse ends. Whoever runs the farthest wins.April 8, 2:20:53 pm EDT
ConnecticutNew Haven, ConnecticutYale University Leitner Family Observatory & Planetarium will host a viewing event on April 8, 2024

April 8, 2024 solar eclipse 2024 quick reference guide – Location, Dates, and Times

LocationPartial BeginsTotality BeginsMaximumTotality EndsPartial Ends
Dallas, Texas12:23 p.m. CDT1:40 p.m. CDT1:42 p.m. CDT1:44 p.m. CDT3:02 p.m. CDT
Idabel, Oklahoma12:28 p.m. CDT1:45 p.m. CDT1:47 p.m. CDT1:49 p.m. CDT3:06 p.m. CDT
Little Rock, Arkansas12:33 p.m. CDT1:51 p.m. CDT1:52 p.m. CDT1:54 p.m. CDT3:11 p.m. CDT
Poplar Bluff, Missouri12:39 p.m. CDT1:56 p.m. CDT1:56 p.m. CDT2:00 p.m. CDT3:15 p.m. CDT
Paducah, Kentucky12:42 p.m. CDT2:00 p.m. CDT2:01 p.m. CDT2:02 p.m. CDT3:18 p.m. CDT
Evansville, Indiana12:45 p.m. CDT2:02 p.m. CDT2:04 p.m. CDT2:05 p.m. CDT3:20 p.m. CDT
Cleveland, Ohio1:59 p.m. EDT3:13 p.m. EDT3:15 p.m. EDT3:17 p.m. EDT4:29 p.m. EDT
Erie, Pennsylvania2:02 p.m. EDT3:16 p.m. EDT3:18 p.m. EDT3:20 p.m. EDT4:30 p.m. EDT
Buffalo, New York2:04 p.m. EDT3:18 p.m. EDT3:20 p.m. EDT3:22 p.m. EDT4:32 p.m. EDT
Burlington, Vermont2:14 p.m. EDT3:26 p.m. EDT3:27 p.m. EDT3:29 p.m. EDT4:37 p.m. EDT
Lancaster, New Hampshire2:16 p.m. EDT3:27 p.m. EDT3:29 p.m. EDT3:30 p.m. EDT4:38 p.m. EDT
Caribou, Maine2:22 p.m. EDT3:32 p.m. EDT3:33 p.m. EDT3:34 p.m. EDT4:40 p.m. EDT

Downloadable High-resolution Solar Eclipse Map

Below is a high-resolution map created by the geeks at NASA. You can download and print as a poster! Just click the Download button below.

Image Credits

In-Article Image Credits

Total Solar eclipse 1999 in France via Luc Viatour with usage type - GNU Free. August 11, 1999
Geometry of a Total Solar Eclipse via Wikimedia Commons by Sagredo with usage type - Public Domain. March 2008
Sun eclipse glasses via Wikimedia Commons with usage type - Public Domain. June 14, 2006
April 8, 2024 Solar Eclipse -total solar eclipse 2024 via NOAA with usage type - Public Domain
Map of the April 8, 2024 Total Solar Eclipse via Great American Eclipse by Michael Zeiler with usage type - Creative Commons License. Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com
Total Solar Eclipse via NASA with usage type - Public Domain
April 8, 2024 solar eclipse animation via NASA by A.T. Sinclair with usage type - Public Domain. 2000
Make your own cardboard box eclipse projector via NASA with usage type - Public Domain
Total Solar Eclipse Over Madras, Oregon via NASA by Aubrey Gemignani with usage type - Public Domain. August 21, 2017
Total solar eclipse diamond-ring effect via NASA by Carla Thomas with usage type - Public Domain. August 24, 2017
Total solar eclipse Baily's Beads via NASA by Aubrey Gemignani with usage type - Public Domain. August 21, 2017
Total Solar Eclipse 2024 shadow via NASA with usage type - Public Domain. August 21, 2017
Total Solar Eclipse Before Totality via NASA by Aubrey Gemignani with usage type - Public Domain. August 21, 2017
Solar Prominences and a Total Solar Eclipse via NASA by Aubrey Gemignani with usage type - Public Domain. August 21, 2017
Total Solar Eclipse Seen from Salem, Oregon via NASA by Dominic Hart with usage type - Public Domain. August 21, 2017

Featured Image Credit

Total Solar eclipse 1999 in France via Luc Viatour with usage type - GNU Free. August 11, 1999

 

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